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Research on Waste Management and Incinerator Options near Mauritius  

 

(@daniel)
Bronze Registered
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 8
19/08/2020 4:54 pm  

Incineration plants are required to have emissions of dioxins and furans and other toxic fumes below a certain limit.

  • The mean dioxin and furan emission from the gasification in the mobile grit reactor was 0.28 ng N-1 m-3, expressed in TEQ (Total Equivalent Toxicity), which lay below the maximum value allowed by the Brazilian legislation (0.5 ng TEQ m-3) and the limits established in other countries like the USA (0.1 to 0.3 ng TEQ m-3 for new plants and 0.3 to 0.8 ng TEQ m-3 for existing plants), Canada (0.5 ng TEQ m-3), and Japan (0.1 to 0.5 ng TEQ m-3) (Caponi et al., 1998).

 

There’s plenty of research that does support the safety and efficacy of incineration plants. In general, there are laws and regulations in place that protect the environment and bar plants from producing too much toxic gas emission. This will be a great way to dispose of the booms. 

List of Japanese Incineration Plants

  • (Japan Waste Management Policies) Intensive measures to prevent the formation of dioxins at the source have been implemented, with a focus on waste treatment methods and improving comprehensive management. The efforts have been very successful, with a 95% reduction in the amount of dioxins emitted between 1997 and 2003. 
  • (Japan’s Environmental Standards)  furnaces (whether suspension-fired, grate-fired, mass-fired, air curtain incinerators, or fluidized bed-fired), and pyrolysis/combustion units. Municipal waste combustion units do NOT include pyrolysis or MWC units located at a plastics or rubber recycling unit (6). 

I don’t know the legal implications or anything; however, I think the best bet is to research more on Japan Incineration Plants. 1) because they seem to have the highest regulations and have the best technology. 2) because it was oil belonging to them initially, so they will likely be willing to help dispose of this waste.

List of Swedish Incineration Plants

  • Filborna Plant
  • SYSAV (Sysav South Scania Waste) waste-to-energy plant

 

I wasn’t able to find much after 30 minutes of searching. Also, Sweden may be a bit far from Mauritius. 

List of Indian Incineration Plants

 

I wasn’t able to find whether all of these were currently still operational to this day. 

Conclusion/Reflections

 

Incineration plants will certainly be a good method of getting rid of the oil booms. There is plenty of research that supports and shows the safety of these plants in the environment. Additionally, I believe that we should focus more on the plants in Japan especially when 1) they seem to have the highest regulations and have the best technology. 2) the oil belonged to them initially, so they will likely be willing to help dispose of this waste. But research shows the effectiveness of incineration plants, and because we already have a lot of booms that are at our disposal, this will be a great method. 

 


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